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Mustards

With flavors like dill pale ale, hot honey, Bavarian ale, and jalapeno, our beer-infused craft mustards will add a little hopp-iness to everything from the ballpark to the beer garden.

The Truth About Mustard

Bright, bold, and full of pungent flavor. We’re talking about the golden star of condiments—mustard. Mustard has been a dinner table staple for centuries. It’s sweet, spicy, and adds a dash of exciting color to foods of all types. But where did this age-old favorite come from?

We’ll squeeze out the lowdown on how mustard is made, where it comes from, and what delicious dishes you can create with it. Let’s hop to it.

What Is Mustard Made Of?

Mustard can be narrowed down to three types of seeds produced by one plant in the Brassica genus. These seeds are brown, black, and white—or yellow due to their corn-like color.

Most mustard on the grocery shelves is made with white or brown mustard seeds—and sometimes it’s a blend of both. Black seeds are rarely used in commercialized mustard but are used broadly in Indian cuisine.

How Is Mustard Made?

When we think of mustard, we think about that bright, bold yellow bottle we just can’t wait to squeeze onto our burgers and hot dogs. But how in the world is this golden condiment made?

Mustard can be prepared as a puree, where the whole seeds are crushed and mixed with water and other liquids to form a paste, or simply ground into a powder. Oftentimes other spices are added for an extra kick of flavor.

Is Mustard Spicy?

The short answer? Yes. But there’s a process behind the spice.

Whole mustard seeds aren’t hot—until you crack them open and mix them with liquid. The spicy flavor of mustard comes from a compound called sinigrin, a glucosinolate naturally found in other pungent plants like horseradish and cabbage.

When crushed, the mustard seeds release an enzyme called myrosinase. This enzyme creates a mustard oil that gets blisteringly hot when mixed with cold water—which can cause burning if your skin comes in contact with it.

What’s the Deal With Dijon?

People have been eating Dijon mustard for centuries. Named after the French town of Dijon, this sweet and spicy condiment was first served in 1336 for the table of King Phillip VI. Today, Dijon’s main ingredients are brown mustard seeds, white wine, water, and salt.

Bier Hall Bavarian Ale Mustard

Beer? Mustard? Together? Absolutely.

If you’re looking for a Dijon alternative, PS Seasoning’s gourmet Bier Hall Bavarian Ale Mustard is an excellent choice. From burgers to brats, this golden mustard can be drizzled on just about anything. Dip your pretzels in a bowl of our beer mustard to spice up your snack or slather it on your schnitzel and sandwiches.

Who Invented Mustard?

Mustard has been around for thousands of years. Believed to have originated from Ancient Egypt, this beloved condiment has been used as medicine by the Greeks and as a cure for the bubonic plague by the Romans. It was the Romans who brought mustard to Northern France. Mustard was later cultivated and produced by the Monks.

What Are the Benefits of Mustard?

There’s a reason why the Greeks and Romans were adamant about medicinal mustard. Mustard is rich in protein, fiber, and vitamins. It can also relieve muscle pain, treat ringworm, aid respiratory disorders, and help fight cancer. Mustard is also a popular home remedy when treating colds and chest congestion.

The Best Mustard Recipes

Smoked Hot Honey Mustard Salmon

Flake things up at the dinner table with our Hot Honey Smoked Salmon recipe. This dish calls for a whole salmon glazed in our Buzzed Hot Honey Ale Mustard. Just spread the mustard on your salmon evenly, top with a sprinkle of black pepper, and smoke for 45-60 minutes.

Make weeknight cooking easy with dinner you just can’t wait to dive your fork into. Continue to read our full—and very short—recipe.

Honey Mustard Roasted Green Beans

Add some gold to your greens. Our Honey Mustard Roasted Green Beans will quickly become a favorite amongst your family and friends. In a large mixing bowl, season your green beans with olive oil, vinegar, shallots, garlic, and our Jackpot Honey Mustard Rub. Roast your mix for 10-12 minutes and drizzle with our Jackpot Sauce. Hit the jackpot with our full recipe.

Beer Brined Mustard Wings

What’s more fun than adding beer to your food? Make wing day every day with PS Seasoning’s Beer Brined Mustard Wings. It doesn’t matter if you choose bone-in or boneless—this recipe is a winner for all wing lovers.

Fill your plate with delicious and crispy caramelized hot honey mustard chicken wings. Start by placing your wings of choice in a large bowl and cover them with beer, then let them sit in the refrigerator for 4-6 hours. After that? The fun starts. Follow our full recipe and top your wings off with Buzzed Hot Honey Ale Mustard.

Do You Put Mustard in the Fridge?

Refrigerating mustard is a hot debate—but let’s get down to the real answer.

Mustard should be stored in the refrigerator. This ensures freshness, safety, and premium taste in every dollop. Just make sure your mustard’s cap or lid is sealed tight, otherwise, air can cause your mustard to dry out—and nobody wants to squeeze out dried mustard.

Find Your Main Squeeze at PS Seasoning

PS Seasoning has everything you need to amplify your dishes and create lasting flavor. Whether you’re a hot honey, dill, or Dijon type of guy or gal, our selection of mustard has got your tastebuds covered. Dig into our extensive collection of craft mustards and shop PS Seasoning today.

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